Archive for September 2019

Edible Plants Along the Trails

 

 

The trails are alive with food! Sometimes, it just takes a keen eye to locate it. Fruits like blackberries and apples are pretty easily identified, while mushrooms, for instance, require more rigorous identification before eating. It is always best to have a field guide for the region you are visiting in order to identify edible plants in the wild and many are available for purchase online or to check out from your local library. When staying at National and Regional Parks, be sure to check in with rangers and campground hosts about collecting edible plants in the wild. Here are a few universal plants in North America that you may come across, and taste, on your next hike.

 

Dandelion –  The humble dandelion can be eaten entirely, from flowers to leaves to roots. Young leaves and flowers can be added to salads or eaten raw, while older leaves and roots taste best boiled.

 

Cattail – This easily identified marsh plant is another plant that can be eaten nearly in its entirety. Young shoots just appearing out of the water are great chopped and steamed like leeks and have a wonderful nutty flavor. Roots are a little fibrous, but can be peeled to the soft, white inner core, chopped, and fried like potatoes. Be careful to inspect the water source where the cattail grows and avoid plants growing in polluted water.

 

 

Wild Onion – If it looks and smells like an onion, it can be eaten like an onion. If it does not smell like an onion, leave it be. Related and smaller garlic and chives can be used in the same way and can add some wonderful flavor to any foraged plant on this list.

 

Purslane – If you are a gardener or tend to your lawn at home, you are probably already familiar with this widely available “weed”. It can be eaten raw or cooked and is a wonderful addition to other mixed greens collected on the trails. Purslane is high in beta-carotene and omega-3 fatty acids and grows low to the ground like a miniature succulent.

 


Milk Thistle – Milk thistle leaves take a little work to prepare, but the resulting cooked greens are both nutritious and delicious. Use gloves or a bandana to collect the leaves from the plant, cut the spines from the leaves, and boil for an easy meal with other greens, roots, or fruit.

National & Regional Parks Made for Boondocking

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Boondocking is not for everyone. It takes resilience and an open heart to rely completely on yourself and what you have within your RV… no hookups, no wifi, no facilities, and often no other people. Some national and regional parks offer a happy midline between basic amenities and  “roughing it”, and are a great way to see if boondocking is for you. The key is knowing what is available in the surrounding vicinity should you need things like food, water, or additional shelter. Here are several locations to consider trying out this unfettered approach to camping.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Canyonlands National Park – Utah

Besides being one of the most breathtaking parks you will likely encounter in the United States, Canyonlands consists of miles and miles of back-country camping for both tents and RVs. Nearby Dead Horse Point State Park has simple pull in camp spots with no hookup and no water, but with a nearby visitor center on site.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Imperial Sand Dunes BLM Land – California

Located in the Southeast corner of California, Imperial Sand Dunes has been a snowbird RV destination for years. You will encounter many other RV enthusiasts here, so plan on being surrounded by many others with their sport ATVs and dirt bikes. There are no hookups or facilities, but overnight camping is permitted and amenities are nearby in Winterhaven, CA and Yuma, AZ.

 

 

Big Cypress National Preserve – Florida

Big Cypress has many “front country” pull in campgrounds with no hookup and no facilities, as well as miles of backcountry preserve. Visitor and welcome centers are limited in the park, but offer enough amenities if you find yourself in a bind.